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Sport Antiques Catalogue - Antique Games

25033

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#25033

Vintage Goodall & Son Bezique Playing Cards.
VINTAGE GOODALL & SON BEZIQUE CARD SET.
Bezique card game in a red leather covered box with gilt tooling to lid with a key and working lock. The box contains four sets of bezique cards (Ace, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen and King) a booklet of the rules and four leather Bezique markers, each a different colour. This wonderful set was made by Charles Goodall & Son, London. Bezique was developed in France and England in the 1860s, certain combinations of cards score various points, and the player with the most points wins. The leather counters each have three 'clock faces' on them with metal arrow pointers. Of the three clocks, one starts at 0 and counts up to 90 in increments of ten, another from 0 to 900 in increments of 100 and the final one again from 0 up to 9000 in increments of 1000.

Goodall, compared to their main rivals at the time, De La Rue, were producing around ¾ of the playing cards that were printed in Britain. Charles Goodall (1785 – 1851) founded his business in around 1820 printing playing cards as well as message cards. Charles learned his trade whilst being an apprentice at Hunt & Sons in 1801, an established playing card manufacturer. They say his early cards had a close resemblance to those of Hunts. By around 1850 both of Charles' sons had joined the company. Goodall was one of the most important card manufacturers in England and his card designs were widely copied by others, he was responsible for the designs that are seen today. In around 1898 Goodall & Sons became a Ltd company but the business soon deteriorated with WWI, eventually the company merged with De La Rue in 1922.

H 5.5 cm x W 22 cm x D 16 cm
H 2" x W 8½" x D 6¼"

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